bawd

  • 181hooker — I (Roget s 3 Superthesaurus) n. Sl. whore, lady of the evening, streetwalker. see prostitute II (Roget s Thesaurus II) noun Slang. A woman who engages in sexual intercourse for payment: bawd, call girl, camp follower, courtesan, harlot,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 182moll — (Roget s Thesaurus II) noun Slang. A woman who engages in sexual intercourse for payment: bawd, call girl, camp follower, courtesan, harlot, prostitute, scarlet woman, streetwalker, strumpet, tart2, whore. Slang: hooker. Idioms: lady of easy… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 183scarlet woman — (Roget s Thesaurus II) noun A woman who engages in sexual intercourse for payment: bawd, call girl, camp follower, courtesan, harlot, prostitute, streetwalker, strumpet, tart2, whore. Slang: hooker, moll. Idioms: lady of easy virtue, lady of… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 184bawdy — [15] The adjective bawdy appears on the scene relatively late, but it is a derivative of bawd ‘prostitute’ or ‘madam’, which entered English in the 14th century. Its origins are not altogether clear, but it appears to have come from the Old… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 185Bowdler —    , BOWDLERIZE    Thomas Bowdler (1754 1825) was born near Bath, England. His father was a strict disciplinarian who prescribed that his son be a physician. The father s prescription was filled only partly, however. Although Thomas became a… …

    Dictionary of eponyms

  • 186convent — (n.) c.1200, covent, cuvent, from Anglo Fr. covent, from O.Fr. convent, from L. conventus assembly, used in M.L. for religious house, originally pp. of convenire come together (see CONVENE (Cf. convene)). Not exclusively feminine until 18c. The… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 187harridan — 1700, one that is half Whore, half Bawd [ Dictionary of the Canting Crew ]; a decayed strumpet [Johnson], probably from Fr. haridelle a poore tit, or leane ill favored jade, [Cotgrave, 1611], in French from 16c., of unknown origin …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 188abbess —    obsolete a female bawd Partly humorous and partly based on the suppositiond that nunneries were not solely occupied by chaste females:    ... who should come in but the venerable mother Abbess herself. (Cleland, 1749, writing of a brothel) …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 189board lodger —    obsolete    a prostitute    The definition covered two categories: those who obtained their finery in addition to their accommodation from a pimp, thus staying under his control; and those who worked on their own, paying commission to the bawd …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 190cohabit —    to have a regular sexual relationship with    Literally, merely to live in the same abode, as do parents and children:     My staff are all highly trained in the Swedish technique and strictly forbidden to cohabit with the customers. (B.… …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 191fleece —    to defraud    By robbery or overcharging, from the shearing of sheep:     ... all the petty cutthroat ways and means with which she used to fleece us. (Cleland, 1749 she was a cheating bawd)    And (for non lawyers) see knight of the Golden… …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 192governess —    obsolete    a female bawd    The 19th century brothel she ran brought back memories of the schoolroom:     The most prominent of the governesses who ran brothels for flagellants was Mrs. Theresa Berkley of 28 Charlotte Street. (Pearsall, 1969) …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 193in the trade —    earning a living by prostitution    The phrase covered anyone in the business, from prostitute to bawd or pimp. The British in trade was a derogatory reference by landed gentry or professional people to those who manufactured or distributed… …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 194knocking-shop —    a brothel    Derived from the obsolete knock but still a common usage:     At the fifth knocking shop, I struck pure gold. (Fraser, 1971: the gold was figurative he had found a bawd to hide him)    Formerly also as knocking house, knocking… …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 195mother —    1.    American    an elderly male homosexual    The obsolete British meaning was a bawd.    2. American    a term of vulgar abuse    Shortened form of motherfucker, but those who use it are unlikely to know that Oedipus was said to have sired… …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 196naughty-house —    obsolete    a brothel    From the sense, wicked:     This house, if it be not a bawd s house, it is pity of her life, for it is a naughty house. (Shakespeare, Measure for Measure)    Naughty lady, a prostitute, seems to have survived into… …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 197procure —    to arrange (prostitution) on behalf of another    Literally, to obtain, of anything, but legal jargon in this sense:     ... she had never heard of my sister, but she would undertake to procure her for me for seventy five dollars. (Fraser,… …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 198run —    1. to smuggle    From one of the myriad meanings of run, in this instance a single voyage or excursion:     You can lay aground by accident and run your goods. (Slick, 1836)    A run is a smuggling trip:     A fine clear run... all the goods… …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 199slag —    a promiscuous woman    Usually young. Partridge (DSUE) suggested perhaps ex slagger , which was an old term used for a bawd but I just wonder if it is not simply back slang for gals, as yob is for boy …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 200pander — n. [Formerly written Pandar.] Procurer, pimp, male bawd …

    New dictionary of synonyms