bawd

  • 41Elizabeth Needham — (right foreground) as portrayed in William Hogarth s A Harlot s Progress Elizabeth Needham (died 3 May 1731), also known as Mother Needham, was an English procuress and brothel keeper of 18th century London, who has been identified as the bawd… …

    Wikipedia

  • 42Pericles, Prince of Tyre — This article is about Shakespeare s play. For other uses, see Pericles (disambiguation). Richard Pelzman as Simonides, Colleen Delany as Thaisa and Ryan Artzberger as Pericles in the Shakespeare Theatre Company s 2007 production of Pericles… …

    Wikipedia

  • 43bawdy — late 14c., soiled, dirty, filthy. Meaning lewd is from 1510s, from BAWD (Cf. bawd) (q.v.), with sense of pertaining to, or befitting a bawd; usually of language (originally to talk bawdy). Bawdy Basket, the twenty third rank of canters, who carry …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 44Bawdry — Bawd ry, n. [OE. baudery, OF. bauderie, balderie, boldness, joy. See {Bawd}.] 1. The practice of procuring women for the gratification of lust. [1913 Webster] 2. Illicit intercourse; fornication. Shak. [1913 Webster] 3. Obscenity; filthy,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 45Pandarus — In Homer s Iliad , Pandarus or Pandaros is a famous archer and the son of Lycaon. Pandarus, who fights on the side of Troy in the Trojan War, first appears in Book Two of the Iliad. In Book Four, he shoots Menelaus and wounds him with an arrow,… …

    Wikipedia

  • 46English-language vowel changes before historic r — In the phonological history of the English language, vowels followed (or formerly followed) by the phoneme /r/ have undergone a number of phonological changes. In recent centuries, most or all of these changes have involved merging of vowel… …

    Wikipedia

  • 47A Harlot's Progress — (also known as The Harlot s Progress ) is a series of six paintings (1731, now lost) and engravings (1732) by William Hogarth. The series shows the story of a young woman, Mary (or Moll) Hackabout, who arrives in London from the country and… …

    Wikipedia

  • 48Rhotic and non-rhotic accents — English pronunciation can be divided into two main accent groups: a rhotic (pronounced /ˈroʊtɨk/, sometimes /ˈrɒtɨk/) speaker pronounces a rhotic consonant in words like hard; a non rhotic speaker does not. That is, rhotic speakers pronounce /r/… …

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  • 49A Mad World, My Masters — Contents 1 Genre 2 Characters 3 Synopsis 4 1977 updated ve …

    Wikipedia

  • 50A Match at Midnight — is a Jacobean era stage play first printed in 1633, a comedy that represents a stubborn and persistent authorship problem in English Renaissance drama. [Stephen Blase Young, ed., A Critical Old Spelling Edition of A Match at Midnight, New York,… …

    Wikipedia

  • 51Celestina, La — ▪ novel by Rojas       Spanish dialogue novel, generally considered the first masterpiece of Spanish prose and the greatest and most influential work of the early Renaissance in Spain.       Originally published in 16 acts as the Comedia de… …

    Universalium

  • 52Bawdstrot — Combination of bawd = lively, shameless, immoral + trot = an old woman; abbr. as bawd in common usage. Originally used of elderly women, the madams of the time, the term became gender free and was applied to anyone who acted as a pimp and… …

    Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • 53Book of Good Love, The —    by Juan Ruiz (1343)    Juan RUIZ’s The Book of Good Love, perhaps the most important long poetic text surviving from medieval Spain, is a miscellany of 12 poems, each focused on a different love affair. The book opens with a prose sermon, or… …

    Encyclopedia of medieval literature

  • 54Celestina, La —    by Fernando de Rojas (ca. 1490–1502)    La Celestina is the name popularly given to the famous Spanish prose dialogue originally published in 1499 as the Comedia de Calisto y Melibea. The anonymous first edition consisted of 16 auctos or acts …

    Encyclopedia of medieval literature

  • 55madam — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. procuress, bawd (see impurity). II (Roget s IV) n. 1. [A title of address] Syn. Mrs., madame, dame, Frau (German), madonna, signora (Italian), señora (Spanish), ma am, marm*. 2. [A woman in charge of… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 56procurer — I procurer, procuress (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. pander, bawd, pimp; obtainer. See evildoer, purchase, acquisition. II (Roget s IV) n. Syn. pander, whoremonger, bawd*, runner*; see pimp …

    English dictionary for students

  • 57prostitute — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. whore, harlot, tart (see impurity). II (Roget s IV) n. Syn. whore, call girl, hustler, harlot, strumpet, lewd woman, bawd, streetwalker, loose woman, fallen woman, courtesan, abandoned woman,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 58whore — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. prostitute, harlot, bawd, strumpet, streetwalker, call girl, B girl, daughter of joy. See evildoer, impurity. II (Roget s IV) n. Syn. call girl, harlot, streetwalker; see prostitute . v. Syn. engage… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 59Libertine — (Roget s Thesaurus) < N PARAG:Libertine >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 libertine libertine Sgm: N 1 voluptuary voluptuary &c. 954a Sgm: N 1 rake rake debauchee loose fish rip rakehell fast man Sgm: N 1 intrigant …

    English dictionary for students

  • 60bawdry — obscenity, late 14c., probably from O.Fr. bauderie boldness, ardor, elation, pride (see BAWD (Cf. bawd)) …

    Etymology dictionary