appall

  • 41Chanson du hérisson (Disque-monde) — La Chanson du hérisson est une chanson chantée par la sorcière Nounou Ogg dans les romans du Disque monde de Terry Pratchett. Elle n apparaît jamais en entier, seuls ces quelques extraits sont disponibles, au gré des romans : Le hérisson,… …

    Wikipédia en Français

  • 42Chanson du hérisson (disque-monde) — La Chanson du hérisson est une chanson chantée par la sorcière Nounou Ogg dans les romans du Disque monde de Terry Pratchett. Elle n apparaît jamais en entier, seuls ces quelques extraits sont disponibles, au gré des romans : Le hérisson,… …

    Wikipédia en Français

  • 43frighten — frightenable, adj. frightener, n. frighteningly, adv. /fruyt n/, v.t. 1. to make afraid or fearful; throw into a fright; terrify; scare. 2. to drive (usually fol. by away, off, etc.) by scaring: to frighten away pigeons from the roof. v.i. 3 …

    Universalium

  • 44daunt — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. t. intimidate, cow, dismay, discourage. See fear, dejection. II (Roget s IV) v. Syn. dismay, appall, horrify, frighten; see dismay , frighten 1 . See Synonym Study at dismay . III (Roget s 3… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 45disgust — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. t. nauseate, sicken, revolt, repel, offend. n. aversion, nausea, loathing, abhorrence. See pain,dislike. II (Roget s IV) n. Syn. loathing, repugnance, revulsion; see hatred 1 , objection 1 . v. Syn.… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 46shock — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. t. shake, jar, jolt; startle, surprise, horrify, scandalize, dis gust; paralyze, stun; galvanize, electrify. n. concussion, jar, impact; brunt, onset, assault; earthquake, temblor; prostration, stroke …

    English dictionary for students

  • 47appalled — (adj.) 1570s, enfeebled; c.1600, dismayed; pp. adjective from APPALL (Cf. appall) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 48appalling — (adj.) 1620s, prp. adjective from APPALL (Cf. appall). Colloquial weakened sense of distasteful is attested from 1919 …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 49pall — {{11}}pall (n.) O.E. pæll rich cloth, cloak, altar cloth, from L. pallium cloak, covering, in Tertullian, the garment worn by Christians instead of the Roman toga; related to pallo robe, cloak, palla long upper garment of Roman women, perhaps… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 50appal — /əˈpɔl / (say uh pawl) verb (t) (appalled, appalling) 1. to overcome with fear; fill with consternation and horror. 2. to shock; dismay; displease. Also, appall. {Middle English apalle(n), from Old French apallir become or make pale} Usage:… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 51ap|pal — «uh PL», transitive verb, intransitive verb, palled, pal|ling. = appall. (Cf. ↑appall) …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 52Affright — Af*fright , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Affrighted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Affrighting}.] [Orig. p. p.; OE. afright, AS. [=a]fyrhtan to terrify; [=a] (cf. Goth. us , Ger. er , orig. meaning out) + fyrhto fright. See {Fright}.] To impress with sudden fear; to …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 53Affrighted — Affright Af*fright , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Affrighted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Affrighting}.] [Orig. p. p.; OE. afright, AS. [=a]fyrhtan to terrify; [=a] (cf. Goth. us , Ger. er , orig. meaning out) + fyrhto fright. See {Fright}.] To impress with sudden …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 54Affrighting — Affright Af*fright , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Affrighted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Affrighting}.] [Orig. p. p.; OE. afright, AS. [=a]fyrhtan to terrify; [=a] (cf. Goth. us , Ger. er , orig. meaning out) + fyrhto fright. See {Fright}.] To impress with sudden …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 55Appalling — Ap*pall ing, a. Such as to appall; as, an appalling accident. {Ap*pall ing*ly}, adv. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 56Appallingly — Appalling Ap*pall ing, a. Such as to appall; as, an appalling accident. {Ap*pall ing*ly}, adv. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 57Bigot — Big ot, n. [F. bigot a bigot or hypocrite, a name once given to the Normans in France. Of unknown origin; possibly akin to Sp. bigote a whisker; hombre de bigote a man of spirit and vigor; cf. It. s bigottire to terrify, to appall. Wedgwood and… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 58Daunt — (d[add]nt; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Daunted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Daunting}.] [OF. danter, F. dompter to tame, subdue, fr. L. domitare, v. intens. of domare to tame. See {Tame}.] 1. To overcome; to conquer. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. To repress or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 59Daunted — Daunt Daunt (d[add]nt; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Daunted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Daunting}.] [OF. danter, F. dompter to tame, subdue, fr. L. domitare, v. intens. of domare to tame. See {Tame}.] 1. To overcome; to conquer. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. To… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 60Daunting — Daunt Daunt (d[add]nt; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Daunted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Daunting}.] [OF. danter, F. dompter to tame, subdue, fr. L. domitare, v. intens. of domare to tame. See {Tame}.] 1. To overcome; to conquer. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. To… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English