Slice

  • 41 slice — An average logistic planning factor used to obtain estimates of requirements for personnel and materiel. (e.g., a personnel slice generally consists of the total strength of the stated basic combatant elements, plus its proportionate share of all …

    Military dictionary

  • 42 slice — [14] Slice comes from Old French esclice ‘splinter’, a derivative of the verb esclicier ‘reduce to splinters, shatter’. This in turn was acquired from Frankish *slītjan, a descendant of prehistoric Germanic *slītan ‘slit’ (source of English slit… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 43 slice up — see slice 2) …

    English dictionary

  • 44 slice —    to cheat (a customer)    Retailer s jargon for overcharging by removing a sliver of cheese etc. from what has been weighed and priced. I cherish the punning phrase slice the gentry, to cheat the better off …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 45 slice n — Golfers hate cake because they might get a slice …

    English expressions

  • 46 slice — noun 1》 a thin, broad piece of food cut from a larger portion.     ↘a portion or share. 2》 a utensil with a broad, flat blade for lifting foods such as cake and fish. 3》 (in sports) a sliced stroke or shot. verb 1》 cut into slices.     ↘(often… …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 47 Slice —  Bei einem Slice beschreibt der Ball einen Bogen nach rechts und verschwindet meisten spurlos im tiefsten Rough oder einem Gewässer. Es soll Spieler geben, die in vielen Jahren noch nie die linke Seite eines Fairways aus der Nähe gesehen haben.… …

    Golf lexikon

  • 48 slice — plokštelė statusas T sritis automatika atitikmenys: angl. plate; segment; slice; strip vok. Lamelle, f; Platte, f; Segment, n rus. ламель, f; пластина, f; пластинка, f pranc. lame, f; lamelle, f; plaque, f; plaquette, f …

    Automatikos terminų žodynas

  • 49 slice — see a slice off a cut loaf isn’t missed …

    Proverbs new dictionary

  • 50 slice — [14] Slice comes from Old French esclice ‘splinter’, a derivative of the verb esclicier ‘reduce to splinters, shatter’. This in turn was acquired from Frankish *slītjan, a descendant of prehistoric Germanic *slītan ‘slit’ (source of English slit… …

    Word origins

  • 51 slice —  a fire shovel. Bristol. So an EGG SLICE …

    A glossary of provincial and local words used in England

  • 52 slice — a broad knife for lifting and dividing fish at a table …

    Dictionary of ichthyology

  • 53 SLICE — Summer Learning In Community Education (Community » Educational) **** Selective Line Insertion Communication Equipment (Computing » Telecom) *** Servanthood Leadership Integrity Commitment Example (Community » Religion) * Symposium For Leadership …

    Abbreviations dictionary

  • 54 slice — (slīs) in tomography, a cross sectional plane of the body selected for imaging …

    Medical dictionary

  • 55 slice — ● ►en n. f. ►DISQUE En anglais, c est une tranche , on trouve donc le terme dans ce sens un peu partout. En particulier comme synonyme exact de partition sous Solaris …

    Dictionnaire d'informatique francophone

  • 56 Slice — 1. (obsolete) one pound note; £1; 2. two dollars; $2 …

    Dictionary of Australian slang

  • 57 þæslíce — adv in that way, so, after this manner, similarly, thus; suitably, fitly, meetly, opportunely, aptly …

    Old to modern English dictionary

  • 58 slice — I Australian Slang 1. (obsolete) one pound note; £1; 2. two dollars; $2 II U.S.A.; Pittsburgh, PA rarely used synonym for Holmes …

    English dialects glossary

  • 59 slice — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. t. cut, slash, carve, shave, skive. See layer. II (Roget s IV) n. Syn. thin piece, slab, wedge, collop; see part 1 . III (Roget s 3 Superthesaurus) I n. piece, cut, segment, sliver, wedge, slab, hunk …

    English dictionary for students

  • 60 slice — vb American to harass, oppress, criticise. A piece of adolescent and teenage slang of the early 1990s, almost always referring to parents or teachers. ► I sure wish the rents would quit slicing me …

    Contemporary slang