Expressiveness

  • 61Western sculpture — ▪ art Introduction       three dimensional artistic forms produced in what is now Europe and later in non European areas dominated by European culture (such as North America) from the Metal Ages (Europe, history of) to the present.       Like… …

    Universalium

  • 62Chinese translation theory — was born out of contact with vassal states during the Zhou Dynasty. It developed through translations of Buddhist scripture into Chinese. It is a response to the universals of the experience of translation and to the specifics of the experience… …

    Wikipedia

  • 63Domain-specific multimodeling — Domain specific multimodeling[1] is a software development paradigm where each view is made explicit as a separate domain specific language (DSL). Successful development of a modern enterprise system requires the convergence of multiple views.… …

    Wikipedia

  • 64expression — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. representation, symbolization, indication; statement, utterance, wording, communication; modulation, shading, interpretation; idiom, phrase, term; aspect, look, pose; token; saying. See affirmation,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 65expressive — [[t]ɪkspre̱sɪv[/t]] 1) ADJ GRADED If you describe a person or their behaviour as expressive, you mean that their behaviour clearly indicates their feelings or intentions. You can train people to be more expressive... She had almost the same look… …

    English dictionary

  • 66awe-inspiring spectacular — Dramatic Dra*mat ic (dr[.a]*m[a^]t [i^]k), Dramatical Dra*mat ic*al (dr[.a]*m[a^]t [i^]*kal), a. [Gr. dramatiko s, fr. dra^ma: cf. F. dramatique.] Of or pertaining to the drama; as, dramatic arts. [WordNet sense 3] [1913 Webster] 2. suitable to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 67Dramatic — Dra*mat ic (dr[.a]*m[a^]t [i^]k), Dramatical Dra*mat ic*al (dr[.a]*m[a^]t [i^]*kal), a. [Gr. dramatiko s, fr. dra^ma: cf. F. dramatique.] Of or pertaining to the drama; as, dramatic arts. [WordNet sense 3] [1913 Webster] 2. suitable to or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 68Dramatical — Dramatic Dra*mat ic (dr[.a]*m[a^]t [i^]k), Dramatical Dra*mat ic*al (dr[.a]*m[a^]t [i^]*kal), a. [Gr. dramatiko s, fr. dra^ma: cf. F. dramatique.] Of or pertaining to the drama; as, dramatic arts. [WordNet sense 3] [1913 Webster] 2. suitable to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 69melodramatic — Dramatic Dra*mat ic (dr[.a]*m[a^]t [i^]k), Dramatical Dra*mat ic*al (dr[.a]*m[a^]t [i^]*kal), a. [Gr. dramatiko s, fr. dra^ma: cf. F. dramatique.] Of or pertaining to the drama; as, dramatic arts. [WordNet sense 3] [1913 Webster] 2. suitable to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 70delicacy — noun (plural cies) Date: 14th century 1. obsolete a. the quality or state of being luxurious b. indulgence 2. something pleasing to eat that is considered rare or luxurious …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 71eloquence — noun Date: 14th century 1. discourse marked by force and persuasiveness; also the art or power of using such discourse 2. the quality of forceful or persuasive expressiveness …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 72expressive — adjective Date: 15th century 1. of or relating to expression < the expressive function of language > 2. serving to express, utter, or represent < foul and novel terms expressive of rage H. G. Wells > 3. effectively conveying meaning or feeling <&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 73poem — noun Etymology: Middle French poeme, from Latin poema, from Greek poiēma, from poiein Date: 15th century 1. a composition in verse 2. something suggesting a poem (as in expressiveness, lyricism, or formal grace) < the house we stayed in…was&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 74vibrato — noun (plural tos) Etymology: Italian, from past participle of vibrare to vibrate, from Latin Date: circa 1876 a slightly tremulous effect imparted to vocal or instrumental tone for added warmth and expressiveness by slight and rapid variations in …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 75Alessandro Scarlatti — (May 2, 1660 ndash; October 24, 1725) was an Italian Baroque composer especially famous for his operas and chamber cantatas. He is considered the founder of the Neapolitan school of opera. He was the father of two other composers, Domenico&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 76Babur — Infobox Monarch name = Babur title = Mughal Emperor of India al ṣultānu l ʿazam wa l ḫāqān al mukkarram pādshāh e ghāzī caption = Portrait of Babur reign = 30 April 1526 – 26 December 1530 coronation = Not formally crowned othertitles = Founder&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 77Cello — This article is about the stringed musical instrument. For other uses, see Cello (disambiguation). Cello Cello, front and side view String Other names Violoncello Hornbos …

    Wikipedia

  • 78Lisp (programming language) — Infobox programming language name = Lisp paradigm = multi paradigm: functional, procedural, reflective generation = 3GL year = 1958 designer = John McCarthy developer = Steve Russell, Timothy P. Hart, and Mike Levin latest release version =&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 79Library classification — forms part of the field of library and information science. It is a form of bibliographic classification (library classifications are used in library catalogs, while bibliographic classification also covers classification used in other kinds of&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 80Music lesson — For other uses, see Music lesson (disambiguation). Teacher using a blackboard to illustrate a music lesson, New Orleans, 1940 …

    Wikipedia