Rabbit Ears

Rabbit Ears est un label de musique américain spécialisé dans l'édition de contes pour enfants (souvent liés à l'histoire de l'Ouest américain).

Les histoires sont lues par des acteurs célèbres sur des musiques originales de musiciens pop-rock réputés. La collection a remporté deux Grammy Awards et de nombreux prix éducatifs aux États-Unis.

Discographie

Année Titre Récitant Musique
1988 Annie Oakley Keith Carradine Los Lobos
1988 Sleepy Hollow Glenn Close Tim Story
1988 Pecos Bill Robin Williams Ry Cooder
1990 Les Habits neufs de l'empereur John Gielgud Mark Isham
1991 Le Roi Midas Michael Caine Ellis Marsalis
1991 The Tiger and the Brahim Ben Kingsley Ravi Shankar
1993 East of the Sun, West of the Moon Max von Sydow Lyle Mays
1993 Koi and the Kola Nuts Whoopi Goldberg Herbie Hancock
1993 Rumpelstiltskin Told Kathleen Turner Tangerine Dream
1993 Puss in Boots Told Tracey Ullman Jean-Luc Ponty
1993 The Boy Who Drew Cats William Hurt Mark Isham
1993 The Fool and the Flying Ship Robin Williams The Klezmer Conservatory Band
1993 Finn McCoul Catherine O'Hara The Boys of the Lough
1993 Follow the Drinking Gourd Morgan Freeman Taj Mahal
1994 Pinocchio Danny Aiello Les Misérables Brass band
1995 Song of Sacajawea Laura Dern David Lindley
1999 John Henry Denzel Washington B. B. King
1999 A Night Before Christmas Meryl Streep The Edwin Hawkins Singers et Van Dyke Parks

Liens externes



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Contenu soumis à la licence CC-BY-SA. Source : Article Rabbit Ears de Wikipédia en français (auteurs)

Regardez d'autres dictionnaires:

  • Rabbit Ears — may refer to:* Rabbit Ears Range in the Rocky Mountains in Colorado * Rabbit Ears Pass in Colorado * Rabbit Ears (Clayton, New Mexico), twin mountain peaks that are a National Historic Landmark * rabbit ears, a dipole antenna * Rabbit Ears… …   Wikipedia

  • rabbit ears — rabbit ,ears noun plural a television ANTENNA (=the part that receives over the air signals and improves the picture) that you put on top of the television and that has two thin upright pieces that form a V …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • rabbit ears — ☆ rabbit ears [with pl. v.] n. 1. Informal an indoor television antenna, consisting of two adjustable rods that swivel apart at a V shaped angle 2. Slang excessive sensitivity to criticism, teasing, etc.: said as of a ballplayer …   English World dictionary

  • rabbit ears — noun 1. an indoor TV antenna; consists of two extendible rods that form a V • Usage Domain: ↑plural, ↑plural form • Hypernyms: ↑television antenna, ↑tv antenna 2. the long ears of a rabbit • Hypernyms: ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • rabbit ears — Antenna An*ten na, n.; pl. {Antenn[ae]}. [L. antenna sail yard; NL., a feeler, horn of an insect.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) A movable, articulated organ of sensation, attached to the heads of insects and Crustacea. There are two in the former, and usually… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rabbit ears — 1. an indoor television antenna consisting of two telescoping, swivel based aerials. 2. Sports Slang. acute sensitivity to gibes, insults, or sarcasm: Players with rabbit ears are the favorite targets of bench jockeys. [1965 70] * * * …   Universalium

  • rabbit ears — np Indoor television antennae. He can t get diddledy on his TV with those rabbit ears. 1950s …   Historical dictionary of American slang

  • rabbit ears — /ˈræbət ɪəz/ (say rabuht earz) plural noun Colloquial 1. large floppy ears, in the style of a rabbit s ears, usually worn as part of a costume. 2. an indoor television antenna with two adjustable arms. 3. the effect of ears above the head of… …   Australian English dictionary

  • rabbit ears — rab′bit ears n. pl. rtv an indoor television antenna consisting of two telescoping, swivel based aerials • Etymology: 1965–70 …   From formal English to slang

  • rabbit ears — noun plural Date: 1952 an indoor dipole television antenna consisting of two usually extensible rods connected to a base to form a V shape …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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